Daily Briefing

Around the nation: Study finds routine kidney disease screening would be cost effective


With the creation of sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT2) inhibitors that have shown efficacy in trials, national kidney disease screening is now cost-effective, according to a new study from Marika Cusick, a candidate in health policy at Stanford University, in today's bite-sized hospital and health industry news from California and Maryland.

 

  • California: With the creation of SGLT2 inhibitors that have shown efficacy in trials, national kidney disease screening is now cost-effective, according to a new study from Marika Cusick, a candidate in health policy at Stanford University. SGLT2 inhibitors were initially used to treat people with type 2 diabetes, but in trials they've been found to slow the degradation of kidney function in patients without diabetes. "Before, we didn't have a good treatment option, an effective treatment option for [chronic kidney disease]. And so that's why early detection didn't necessarily improve outcomes," Cusick said. "And now, because we have an effective treatment option, I think the value of screening is really different." (Cueto, STAT, 5/22)
  • California: San Francisco's emergency management department on Tuesday announced it is launching a pilot program to address "when someone is so far under the influence of drugs that they may pose a danger to themselves or others." Details of the program will be announced next week, however Supervisor Dean Preston said he's been told the pilot will involve arresting people deemed by authorities to be exhibiting signs of public drug use. San Francisco Mayor London Breed said there is a need to "hold people accountable when their behavior on the street is disruptive to residents, families, and small businesses." (Dickey, Axios, 5/24)
  • Maryland: CMS on Tuesday announced a proposal that would require pharmacy benefit managers (PBMs) to disclose the prices they negotiate for prescription drugs for Medicaid. Specifically, the proposal would require PBMs to submit annual reports on prescription drug prices, allowing CMS and states to ensure Medicaid is paying appropriate prices for medications and receiving proper shares of drugmaker rebates, the agency said. HHS Secretary Xavier Becerra said, with the proposal, "we are advancing unprecedented efforts to increase transparency in prescription drug costs, being good stewards of the Medicaid program and protecting its financial integrity. This proposed rule will save both states and the federal government money." (Turner, Modern Healthcare, 5/23)

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